Banque mondial

Disponible uniquement sur Etudier
  • Pages : 311 (77638 mots )
  • Téléchargement(s) : 0
  • Publié le : 15 avril 2011
Lire le document complet
Aperçu du document
EMBARGOED: Not for newswire transmission, posting on websites, or any other media use until January 13, 2011, 00:01 GMT (which is January 12, 2011, 7:01pm in Washington, DC)

EMBARGOED: Not for newswire transmission, posting on websites, or any other media use until January 13, 2011, 00:01 GMT (which is January 12, 2011, 7:01pm in Washington, DC)

© 2011 The International Bank forReconstruction and Development / The World Bank 1818 H Street NW Washington DC 20433 Telephone: 202-473-1000 Internet: www.worldbank.org E-mail: feedback@worldbank.org All rights reserved 1 2 3 4 13 12 11 10 This volume is a product of the staff of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this volume do notnecessarily reflect the views of the Executive Directors of The World Bank or the governments they represent. The World Bank does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries, colors, denominations, and other information shown on any map in this work do not imply any judgment on the part of The World Bank concerning the legal status of any territory or the endorsement oracceptance of such boundaries. Rights and Permissions The material in this publication is copyrighted. Copying and/or transmitting portions or all of this work without permission may be a violation of applicable law. The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank encourages dissemination of its work and will normally grant permission to reproduce portions of the workpromptly. For permission to photocopy or reprint any part of this work, please send a request with complete information to the Copyright Clearance Center Inc., 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, USA; telephone: 978-750-8400; fax: 978-750-4470; Internet: www.copyright.com. All other queries on rights and licenses, including subsidiary rights, should be addressed to the Office of the Publisher,The World Bank, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433, USA. fax: 202-522-2422; e-mail: pubrights@worldbank.org.

EMBARGOED: Not for newswire transmission, posting on websites, or any other media use until January 13, 2011, 00:01 GMT (which is January 12, 2011, 7:01pm in Washington, DC)

Global Economic Prospects January 2011

Global Economic Prospects January 2011: Navigating strong currentsOverview & main messages
Economic activity in most developing countries has, or is close to having, recovered. Supported by a resurgence in international and domestic financial flows and higher commodity prices, most of the spare capacity in developing countries that was created by the crisis has been reabsorbed, and developing countries have regained trend growth rates close to those observedin the pre-crisis period. In contrast, the recovery in many highincome countries (and several economies in developing Europe and Central Asia) has not been strong enough to make major inroads into high unemployment and spare capacity. Prospects in these economies, many of which were at the center of the financial boom and bust, continue to be weighed down by bankingsector restructuring, highconsumer debt and a right-sizing of economic sectors that grew unsustainably large during the boom period. The robust recovery in developing countries is all the more remarkable because it mainly reflects an expansion of their internal markets. Developing countries are not just leading the recovery. Increasingly they are an important source of stability, with many of the risks to global growth centeredin high-income countries and reflecting as yet unresolved imbalances generated by the boom period. Very low policy-induced interest rates in high -income countries plus better growth prospects in developing countries prompted a strong recovery in capital flows, mainly to middle-income countries. Overall net private capital flows to developing countries expanded 44 percent in 2010, but remain...
tracking img