Soviet attack

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Title: Developments (Ideological/political, socio/economical and geo-political) in Czechoslovakia which led to the invasion by the Soviet Union in 1968

Ideological / Political Development
It has been almost four decades since the invasion of Soviet infiltrated into Wenceslas Square of Czechoslovakia’s capital in order to defeat a resisting movement ofreform called the “Prague Spring”. The attempts of Alexander Dubcek in order to create “human face socialism” are something thing that is all the time seen as ideological and or historical predecessor to the reform policies of perestroika and glasnost of Mikhail Gorbachev which took place in the USSR in early 80s (Jones, 1990). 1968 invasion was the event which devastated most of the Socialism’sillusions and the system of the Soviet – together of which happened in the West and Czechoslovakia. It was the year of 1968 when the sudden overwhelming impact of Soviet alliance system took over the steady rotting issue of Romania. It was then that the Prague Spring brought even critical challenge as compared to the challenge of Romania since it took place in an area that was of more importance toSoviet security. Alexander Dubcek’s programme of domestic liberalization of the communist regime of Czechoslovak posed more threat to carryout popular demands in order to gain the same changes in the other countries of East Europe and also some Soviet Union parts. (Jones, 1990)
According to Khrushchev, Warsaw Pact importance was due to his step towards detente with the West. The sole reason for thiswas to gain another control in the time of cold war. There were good political reasons as well as military reasons behind the formation of such organization by which the new Soviet leaders, Bulganin and Khrushchev could take on their own control systems and ideas over the East European countries. In order to keep things together, Stalin utilized his overwhelming and dictatorial character. Howeverwhen he got aged, he turned out to be anti-change which in due course, led to isolation outside and stagnation at home (Kramer, 1993). Stalin had his four chief aims that given the motivation for supporting and backing the takeovers of Communist in East European Countries. First, he desired the denial of area to the hostile countries to Moscow and who could endanger its security. Second, hewanted insuring that the local system of politics in the region stays under the influence of USSR friendly elements. Third, he wanted to make use of the areas resources to hold up the post-war economic development and upturn. Lastly, the fourth, he wanted to be of able to utilize East European counties as a possible jump off spot for a potential offense against the West. (Kramer, 1993)
The movement ofreform was a result of tensions between old-fashioned doctrine and contemporary economic practices and political practices. Throughout the 50s, the Czechoslovakia followed severe inflexible obedience to Communist ideology which resulted in wounding up with system of economics and politics that generated far much less. There was real decline in Czech’s industrial base which previously was one ofthe best in the region. Changes seemed very important, much changes were made comprising disengaging the central planning and economy, responsibilities of local level were given to managers, encouraging the incentives against the penalties and full control were given to Slovaks. (McDougall, 1989)
This liberalization programme resulted in worry among other members of the Warsaw Pact as theyrealized that the situation is getting out of control. There was a great danger of losing control of orthodox communist party as far as Soviet Union was concerned. Attempts were carried out by Soviets in order to take control back by means of offensive troop movements, propaganda and political discussion. This type of invasion was in reality an initial demonstration of “Brezhnev Doctrine” in which he...
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