A little-known story

Disponible uniquement sur Etudier
  • Pages : 5 (1128 mots )
  • Téléchargement(s) : 0
  • Publié le : 12 avril 2011
Lire le document complet
Aperçu du document
Lionel Logue was an Australian who moved to England during the 1920s. He was a pioneer in the teaching of elocution and as what we today call a speech therapist. His success brought him to the notice of the Royal Household, and he was soon requested to take on another patient: H.R.H. Prince Albert, Duke of York, second son of King George V.
Bertie, as the Royal Family called him, had a severestammer that had begun during his spartan childhood and became worse as he grew up. Already outshown by his glamourous older brother the Prince of Wales, Bertie's speech difficulties caused him endless embarassment and hid his many fine qualities. Fortunately, Bertie had a wife who was determined to help her husband. Elizabeth, Duchess of York either introduced her husband to Logue or was otherwiseinstrumental in helping the two to connect. Over the next several years Logue met with his royal patient many times and eventually succeeded in helping the Duke gain more self confidence and speak more clearly.
Logue and Bertie's success came to be of national importance in December 1936 when King Edward VIII suddenly abdicated and left the throne to his younger brother. Now King George VI,Bertie was required to make many speeches both in person and over the air. He never completely mastered his stammer, but his improvement, fostered by Logue and by Queen Elizabeth, enabled him to speak fluently enough to satisfy all but the most severe critics. This was critical, because King George was to lead his nation and Empire through some of its darkest times of war and economic downturn.Mark Logue is the grandson of Lionel Logue. This book is based in part on Lionel's diaries, and contains much new material on the King's speech problems and the therapies that alleviated them. It is very well written and illustrated and will be of interest to historians, those who deal with speech difficulties, and anyone who enjoys reading about determined, quietly heroic people.
Logue andBertie's success came to be of national importance in December 1936 when King Edward VIII suddenly abdicated and left the throne to his younger brother. Now King George VI, Bertie was required to make many speeches both in person and over the air. He never completely mastered his stammer, but his improvement, fostered by Logue and by Queen Elizabeth, enabled him to speak fluently enough to satisfy allbut the most severe critics. This was critical, because King George was to lead his nation and Empire through some of its darkest times of war and economic downturn.

Mark Logue is the grandson of Lionel Logue. This book is based in part on Lionel's diaries, and contains much new material on the King's speech problems and the therapies that alleviated them. It is very well written andillustrated and will be of interest to historians, those who deal with speech difficulties, and anyone who enjoys reading about determined, quietly heroic people.
Mark Logue and Peter Conradi were able to look through Lionel Logue's case files and put together a very good record of Logue's work with George VI. Whether Lionel Logue "saved the monarchy" is a bit in doubt, but he did give confidence andsuccess to the George VI when he - and the nation and the Commonwealth - needed it the most.

A note to the authors - Wallis Simpson was from an old Baltimore, Maryland family, not a Pennsylvania one.
Stuttering: A Life Bound Up In Words" by Marty Jezer delves into the issue of self-acceptance, and living WITH a severe stutter that persisted for his entire life. Jezer has referred to theself-loathing and fear that accompanies the lives of many people who stutter as the "secondary effects" of stuttering, that in fact may persist even when the actual stutter has been "healed."
a private portion of the life of the man who was King of the United Kingdom and head of the British dominions throughout the world during World War II, a time described by Churchill as both the darkest and finest...
tracking img