Kirsten's cookie

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  • Publié le : 19 mai 2010
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Kristen’s cookie company

1. How long will it take you to fill a rush order?
The first production step is done by myself and consists to wash out the mixing bowl, prepare all of the ingredients and mix them in my food processors. I’m able to prepare ingredients for three dozen in this step, but it takes always six minutes if I cook one or three dozens. Secondly, I must dish up thecookies onto a tray, and this takes two minutes. As I can’t prepare several trays in the same time, it takes me two minutes per tray. Then, the next step is done by my roommate. He puts the cookies into the oven and sets the thermostat at timer, the whole takes a one little minute. Then, the cookies cook alone in the oven for nine minutes. After these nine minutes, the roommate removes the cookiesfrom the oven and they cool outside for five minutes. When they are cool, the roommate takes two minutes to pack them in a box. Finally, for the last minute he accepts the payment and gives the cookies to the customer.

To conclude, in adding every steps of the process production we can see that the Theoretical Flow Time is twenty-six minutes long.

2. How many orders can you fill in anight, assuming you are open fours hours each night?

First we can see with this table the resource capacity of our resources. The oven has the weakest capacity (6 dozen per hour at full utilization). Therefore, the oven is the bottleneck of the process which means that the oven’s capacity represents as well the capacity of the whole process. Indeed, the entire process is done according to theoven.

For example, when the washing and the mixing have been prepared, we must still wait that the oven is free. We represent that with a buffer time two minutes long. Finally, after a short observation we get to the conclusion that the cycle time is ten minutes long.
We finish the first dozen and ten minutes late the second.

To answer the question, we found this equation
26+ 10 (x-1) = 240 ( x = 22,4
26 minutes represents time required for the first dozen.
10 minutes is the cycle time multiply by x who is number of orders which could be filled in a night or the number of batches. But minus one because the first dozen is already counted in the 26 minutes.
And 240 minutes is the time while the Kristen's Cookies is opened,
As we found 22,4, we canassume 22 orders per night.

3. How much of your own and you roommate’s valuable time will it take to fill each order?

The steps done by ourselves are wash bowl, mix and put the mixture in the tray and take respectively six and two minutes. Then, the steps done by our roommate are preparation of the oven, leave the tray from oven and collect the money and take respectively one, zero andthree minutes. These two sums represent our cycle time and this of our roommate.

4. Because your baking trays can hold exactly one dozen cookies, you will produce and sell cookies by the dozen. Should you give a discount for people who order two dozen cookies, or more? If so, how much? …
First of all, to give a discount for people who order an extra dozen cookies (in this case 2 or 3dozen) we have to analyze the production cost. And if we found that the production cost per dozen decrease when we produce at the same time more dozen cookies, then we can give a discount per extra dozen cookies produced.

We don’t pay any fixed cost because is the landlord who pays the electricity. The variables costs are always the same (ingredients and boxes), so it doesn’t matter if weproduce one or three dozen cookies at the same time because we always pay the same quantity per dozen produced. That’s mean that the only cost per dozen that change when we produce some dozens at the same time is the valuable working time.

Like we said at the third question, our working time is 12 minutes to produce one dozen. When we produce two dozens at the same time we need 8.30...
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