Scor method

Disponible uniquement sur Etudier
  • Pages : 18 (4396 mots )
  • Téléchargement(s) : 0
  • Publié le : 20 avril 2011
Lire le document complet
Aperçu du document
Supply-Chain Operations Reference-model

PLAN SOURCE MAKE DELIVER RETURN

Version

SCOR is a registered trademark in the United States and Europe

8.0

SCOR Overview

Supply-Chain Operations Reference-model
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section One: What is a Process Reference Model? 1 Section Two:
Model Scope and Structure

3 15
15 19 21

Section Three:
Applying the Model The Conceptof Configurability Configuring Supply-Chain Threads Developing Process Maps

Section Four:
Summary

23

Table of Contents

The Supply Chain Operations Reference-model (SCOR®) has been developed and endorsed by the Supply-Chain Council (SCC), an independent not-for-profit corporation, as the cross-industry standard for supply-chain management. The SCC was organized in 1996 by PittiglioRabin Todd & McGrath (PRTM) and AMR Research, and initially included 69 voluntary member companies. Council membership is now open to all companies and organizations interested in applying and advancing stateof-the-art supply-chain management systems and practices. Member companies pay a modest annual fee to support Council activities. All who use the SCOR-model are asked to acknowledge the SCC in alldocuments describing or depicting the SCOR-model and its use. The complete SCOR-model and other rleated models of the SCC are only accessable through the members’ section of the www.supply-chain.org website. SCC members further model development by participating in project development teams- SCOR and other related SCC Models are collaborative ongoing projects that seek to represent current supplychain and related practice. Further information regarding membership, the Council and SCOR can be found at the Council’s web site: www.supply-chain.org.
© Copyright 2006 Supply-Chain Council

SCOR Overview

What Is a Process Reference Model?
Section

ONE

Process reference models integrate the well-known concepts of business process reengineering, benchmarking, and process measurementinto a cross-functional framework.

Business Process Reengineering
Capture the “as-is” state of a process and derive the desired “to-be” future state

Benchmarking

Best Practices Analysis

Process Reference Model

Capture the “as-is” state of a process and derive the desired “to-be” future state

Quantify the operational performance of similar companies and establish internal targetsbased on “best-in-class” results Characterize the management practices and software solutions that result in “best-in-class” performance

Quantify the operational performance of similar companies and establish internal targets based on “best-in-class” results

Characterize the management practices and software solutions that result in “best-in-class” performance

SCOR Overview

1

AProcess Reference Model Contains:
• • • • • Standard descriptions of management processes A framework of relationships among the standard processes Standard metrics to measure process performance Management practices that produce best-in-class performance Standard alignment to features and functionality

Once a Complex Management Process is Captured in Standard Process Reference Model Form, Itcan Be:
• • • • Implemented purposefully to achieve competitive advantage Described unambiguously and communicated Measured, managed, and controlled Tuned and re-tuned to a specific purpose

A Process Reference Model Becomes a Powerful Tool in the Hands of Management

2

SCOR Overview

Model Scope and Structure
Section

The Boundaries of Any Model Must Be Carefully Defined
“From yoursupplier’s supplier to your customer’s customer” SCOR spans:
• All customer interactions, from order entry through paid invoice • All product (physical material and service) transactions, from your supplier’s supplier to your customer’s customer, including equipment, supplies, spare parts, bulk product, software, etc. • All market interactions, from the understanding of aggregate demand to the...
tracking img